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Gluten free flour blends

red grape seed flourRed grape seed flour: Not run-of-the-mill

This post was prompted by some good questions left in comments:

Do you make your own gluten free flour mix or do you purchase a particular brand?  If you purchase it, where do you get it?  If you make it can I have your recipe?

The reply got so long, I decided to copy it here instead.

A combination of flours usually gives the best result for gluten free baked goods. For example:

Flour Blend 1 – Basic Rice Flour Blend

  • 6 cups brown or white rice flour
  • 2 cups potato starch
  • 1 cup tapioca starch

OR

Flour Blend 2 – Bread Flour Blend

Mix flours well in a large container.  Use this blend to replace wheat flour in recipes.

Keep in mind, there are many ways to combine flours.  And so many other excellent gluten free flours for baking:  gluten free oat flour, amaranth, quinoa, mesquite, etc.

Depending on how the recipe is formulated and what you’re making, you may need to add a small amount of xanthan, guar gum, or psyllium husk powder when converting from traditional to gluten free.  Some bakers add xanthan gum to their flours when creating a bulk flour blend. I usually prefer to leave gums out of bulk flour blends.  Adding xanthan (to thoroughly mixed dry ingredients) or guar as needed to a recipe will give you more flexibility with the all purpose blend. But whatever works best for you is the right way to go.

Flour Blend 1 is the rice flour combo that everyone knows.  It was created by Bette Hagman, a pioneer in gluten free baking.

Flour Blend 2 comes from the bread classes that I started teaching at Kitchen Conservatory.  This blend can also be used for muffins and scones, along with breads of course.  If you’re not baking often, store this blend in the fridge or freezer in an airtight container.

Not that you couldn’t use Flour Blend 1 for breads or pizza crust, but those types of things definitely benefit from a ratio tweaking to optimize texture and flexibility.

As for a ready-to-use flour blend, I recommend King Arthur Flour. It’s basically a rice flour blend, bland (but that’s good), and won’t overpower baked goods. There is no xanthan or guar in this blend, so add that to recipes as needed. Pamela’s Artisan Flour Blend is the best cup-for-cup replacement product on the market. This blend is springier than a typical rice blend and contains guar gum, so there’s no need to add a binder.

 

Comments

  1. I can’t wait to try these pumpkin donuts, but must order the pans first. Do the donuts work using a mini-bundt pan?

    • I love mini bundt pans! I haven’t made donuts in them, but I’m pretty sure it would work fine. Just be sure to grease and gf flour the pan well before using.

      • Thank-you so much for telling me the mini-bundt pans would work. They did indeed! I had just enough batter to fill one pan of the mini-bundts, one pan of the donuts, and one pan of mini-donuts. I forgot to dust the pans with gf flour after greasing, but they all popped out just fine. And, they are DELICIOUS!!!! Thanks for making my first try at gf baking a delightful success!

  2. kathelleen says:

    I was lead to believe that using any starch is still not good for “gluten” free. It is still a issue if you are trying to lose weight. Are there recipes w/ out using any form of starch to make some of these ingredients?

    • Starches are great for gluten free baking. There are some lower carb ideas here like the instant german chocolate cake or this low carb bun for one. But for the most part this blog features recipes geared towards people with celiac disease who eat and bake gluten free out of necessity, not for weight loss. The flour blends above do the best job of replicating traditional wheat-filled counterparts. Like I’ve said before, there is no single best way to approach gluten free baking. I’d recommend looking at a variety of books and sites to find the recipes and style of baking that suits your needs. If you google ‘coconut flour’ or ‘almond flour’ recipes, you’ll find lots of great baking ideas. Hope that helps!

  3. Hi! I was wondering if I could substitute something else for the almond meal in the Flour Blend #2? Flax meal maybe? I have to avoid corn, soy, rice, wheat, rye, barley, almond, and coconut for my children. Thank you!

    • That flour blend is merely a guide. And I’ve strayed from it often. Instead of subbing something else in, I’d simply leave it out. That’s what I do when I’ve run out of almond meal.
      I’ve heard of bakers using sunflower seeds ground into a flour as a substitute for almond flour just keep in mind that if the recipe you’re making calls for baking powder and/or soda, you could wind up with green baked goods due to a chemical reaction with the flour.

  4. In your flour 2 blend, does “part” mean cup? Just want to make sure bc you used the word “cup” in the flour 1 blend. Thanks!

  5. Becky Bowen says:

    I’m completely out of potato starch and making it sounds waaay too difficult for me, any suggestions for subbing or should I just leave it out?

  6. I buy my flour blend from Manini’s out of Seattle Washington. They are on Facebook and also have a website Maninis dot com.

    I make all my bread from their flours. They are ancient grain flours. All the flours are interchangeable and make just wonderful breads with loads of flavor and light texture. The breads can be made in a bread pan (9 x 4) or free form on parchment on pizza stone, and made at night for next morning baking. Manini’s also make a pasta flour which I’ve used to make my own pasta and the flavor of the cooked pasta meets or exceeds any Italian pasta you could purchase (if you were not gluten free, that is) and far exceeds any “factory food” pasta you can purchase at any grocery store.

    Love the flours they make and they’re reasonable (do the math) and can even use their Multiuso flour for pie pastry that is to die for and not hard and unforgiving. Can’t say enough good things about the product they produce. Actually all their flours are interchangeable.

    I purchase it via mail and arrives quickly and with excellent packaging. To this day, I’ve not found anything to match it. It contains no rice flour, but is made from Amaranth, Teff, Millet, Sorghum.

  7. Have you ever cooked with chickpea/garbanzo bean flour?

    • Yes, but only in a few breads like naan, where I actually wanted the beany flavor to be pronounced. I like garbanzo flour, but not everyone does. It’s a great gluten free flour option, though.

  8. charlene says:

    What flour can I use instead of almond meal?

    Thanks

Trackbacks

  1. […] gives the best result for gluten free baked goods. For these sticky buns, I’ve only used a sorghum flour bread blend. If you sub another gluten free blend, I’d love to hear about the […]

  2. […] Make a sorghum flour blend by combining: 2 parts sorghum flour, 2 parts tapioca flour, 1 part potato starch, and 1 part almond meal. Mix flours well in a large container. Use this blend to replace wheat flour in recipes. Read more about gluten free blends here. […]

  3. […] A combination of gluten free flours usually gives the best result. Pick up a ready to use flour blend or use your favorite all-purpose mix. Get more information about gluten free flour blends here. […]

  4. […] Make a sorghum flour blend by combining: 2 parts sorghum flour, 2 parts tapioca flour, 1 part potato starch, and 1 part almond meal. Mix flours well in a large container. Use this blend to replace wheat flour in recipes. Read more about gluten free blends here. […]

  5. […] A combination of gluten free flours usually gives the best result for gluten free baked goods. Find more info blends here. […]

  6. […] how to make your own gluten free flour blends. The bread flour blend is great for muffins and scones, […]